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Digital Scrapbook Color Challenge & FREEBIES Hop!

CCG_247Here is a digital scrapbook freebie to match the new Caribbean Scrapbook Kit in tropical caribbean colors red, coral, sand and seafoam green to scrapbook your beach vacation or cruise. See digital scrapbook coupon codes and freebies download at the bottom of this post.

digital scrapbook freebie

Caribbean Beach Scrapbook Kit

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Project Life Journal Cards

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homeschool-math

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30%, 50% or 50% Off Scrapbook Coupon Codes

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Beach Layout

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Download Digital Scrapbook Freebie

Click on the image for a direct SAFE direct download. I pay a monthy fee to protect you corrupted downloads. It’s polite to leave a comment. Thank you.

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45 comments

  1. Thanks for the fun challenge and for letting me participate at the last minute. I look forward to the next one.

  2. Wonderful!! Glad to see all of these lovelies gals!

    Great too, to have this going to be a regular feature for us! Love our Digital Designers Etsy Team!

    Thanks Robin!

    Cherie

  3. Lindsey Ritchey

    i want a design with pink blue aqua navy and white colors, pretty and coral

    • Oh, Lindsey! Those colors sound awesome! Great palette! Thanks for the input!

      Cherie
      Digital Designers Team Member

  4. This kit is gorgeous! You are so generous. Thank you.

  5. Thanks so much from…Smithville, TN!

  6. Laura (sandytoz)

    Thanks!

  7. Sheryl Remy

    Just found your site. Thank you.

  8. Such cute colors!

  9. Sheila Tremayne

    Many thanks! Beautiful images….so colourful!

  10. lemondedis

    these are so pretty : thanks a lot ! I share the link here : https://www.facebook.com/LMIlesptitscadeauxPL?ref=hl and there : http://pinterest.com/lemondedis/project-life-freebies/

  11. Thank you so much. This is beautiful. I’ll probably grab lots now, so bright and fresh.

  12. Thank you very much for all your freebies and the work you put in them! Love them!!!
    Many blessings!

  13. Thank you!!!!

  14. thank you hope to use this wonderful kit soon!

  15. I’m really enjoying the design and layout of your website.
    It’s a very easy on the eyes which makes it much more enjoyable for me to come here and visit more often. Did you
    hire out a designer to create your theme? Superb work!

  16. Thank you so much for your generous freebies 🙂

  17. So pretty. Thank you

  18. Your mode off explaining all in this piece of writing is
    in fact pleasant, every one be capable of simply know it,
    Thanks a lot.

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  19. I think we may be seeing a future Olympic swimmer in the making there! Now, I’m sure that some of you have concerns. And before anyone freaks out, know that the parents of the young child, Elizabeth, write to let everyone know that they have backgrounds in both nursing and life guarding. The clip was posted on YouTube by userwho additionally writes about the background:

  20. The diamond texture enables the hard cases to be virtually scratch-proof; a concept unheard of in the world of polycarbonate hard shells. In fact, it’s so textured that you can jab at it with a pair of scissor and there will be few marks that are easily wiped off with a cloth. All wheels are anti-shock. Ball-bearing wheels mean that no matter how heavy you pack it, the wheels stay centered. These are considered to be among the lightest cases in the market. Even the 27 inch weighs only 10.4 pounds. The smallest case in this line, the 20-inch business case, starts from $415, while the massive 31-inch trolley is $785.(MoneyWatch) Neuroscience is all the rage these days, promising to solve the problems of why diets don’t work, why teenagers are inarticulate and why we crave donuts when we are tired. In some of these cases, the promise is genuine and the learning is practical. But in the farther reaches of neuroscience — neuroeconomics, for example, and neuroleadership — the claims to have achieved a mechanical, deterministic understanding of the brain that can change behaviors and outcomes is wildly misleading.

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  24. A cookie is a small file of letters and numbers that we put on your computer if you agree. Sting, ABC, FedEx,5:00 p. This helps us to improve the way our website works, These cookies allow us to distinguish you from other users of our website,The teams presented their ideas to the judging panel which included , a senior a marketing and economics major. They allow us to recognise and count the number of visitors and to see how visitors move around the site when they are using it.

  25. propulsion system as a whole, including all the redundancies, is working

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  27. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: July 22, 2009 Astronauts David Wolf and Christopher Cassidy are preparing for a challenging spacewalk today, working at the far left end of the International Space Station’s long power truss to replace four of six aging batteries in the lab’s oldest set of solar arrays. An artist’s concept of spacewalkers Chris Cassidy (left) and Dave Wolf (right) working to swap out batteries on the Port 6 truss. Credit: NASA TVIf one visualizes a football field, the station’s airlock is on the right side of the 50-yeard line while the port-six, or P6, solar array is deep in the left end zone. Along with working far from the safety of the airlock, the spacewalkers must manually swap out 375-pound batteries without damaging fragile cooling fins.”EVA 3 brings its own challenges,” Wolf said in a NASA interview. “Chris, Navy Seal, he and I will go out several hundred feet, multiple tether lengths out. There’s no way to get back quick. The (space station) robot arm will place these large solar array batteries reasonably near where they will be installed. But we’ll be handling these heavy batteries, each the size of a small refrigerator, each with rows of delicate cooling fins on the back.”And we will pull those out of the Vertical Cargo Carrier, hand them back and forth until we get them in position and mate those fins with the opposing fins on the space station. Those are cooling fins so those batteries won’t overheat in use. We’ll do four of those batteries on EVA-3. We’ll do two more EVA-4 and we consider this one of the highest critical pieces of work to do on this mission.”The final two P6 batteries will be replaced during a spacewalk Friday by Cassidy and Thomas Marshburn.Today’s spacewalk was scheduled to begin at 10:58 a.m. EDT, but the astronauts were running ahead of schedule in their preparations and could start early. This will be the 128th EVA devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998, the ninth so far this year and the third of five planned by Endeavour’s crew. It will be the seventh spacewalk for Wolf and the first for Cassidy, a former Navy Seal.For identification, Wolf will be wearing a spacesuit with solid red stripes around the legs while Cassidy will use a suit with diagonal stripes.”P6 is the truss segment that’s been up there the longest and the batteries are therefore the oldest so those batteries need to be changed out and there’s six of them total,” Cassidy said in a NASA interview. “We’ve learned in our training that it’s unrealistic to get six completed in one spacewalk. So Dave and I will tackle four and they need to be done in pairs. You know, when you read the instructions on your flashlight and it says, ‘Don’t mix an old one and a new one together,’ I never knew why. Well, the same thing applies to space batteries. You want the pairs to be both new batteries. We can’t mix old ones and new ones.”So consequently if we do two and we try to do the third, we’re committed to the fourth. I think we could probably do five in one EVA, but it doesn’t make sense from a hardware perspective. They’re done in sets. So we’re doing these first four batteries.”Each nickel-hydrogen battery measures 40-by-36-by-18 inches and weighs 375 pounds. Two batteries in series can store 8 kilowatts of power. The batteries have a design life of 6.5 years and can endure more than 38,000 charge/discharge cycles.”P6 is a long ways away from the airlock,” Cassidy said. “I think it’s the farthest you could get from the airlock hatch because the airlock’s on the starboard side. We’re going port, and it’s way out there. We have safety tethers that allow us to go 55 or 85 feet. There’s two different sizes and so we have to stack … some together to give us twice the distance.”The task in and of itself, of physically pulling out a battery and putting it in, is not necessarily the hard part,” Cassidy said. “The hard part is the choreography with the folks moving the arm, Doug (Hurley) and Julie (Payette). As we grab the battery, they’ll guide the pallet, the ICC-VLD, away from us, essentially pulling the battery out of the carrier. And then Dave and I have to … do a series of hand offs. He grabs it and then I move and then I’ll grab it and he lets go and then he moves and we kind of do this hopping motion until we get to the spot where the battery’s going to go.”Here is an updated timeline of today’s activity (in EDT and mission elapsed time; includes revision K of the NASA television schedule):EDT……..DD…HH…MM…EVENT07/2206:03 AM…06…12…00…STS/ISS crew wakeup06:43 AM…06…12…40…EVA-3: 14.7 psi repress/hygiene break07:28 AM…06…13…25…EVA-3: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi07:53 AM…06…13…50…EVA-3: Campout EVA preps08:03 AM…06…14…00…ISS daily planning conference09:23 AM…06…15…20…EVA-3: Spacesuit purge09:38 AM…06…15…35…EVA-3: Spacesuit prebreathe10:28 AM…06…16…25…EVA-3: Crew lock depressurization10:33 AM…06…16…30…SSRMS ICC maneuver to EVA work site10:58 AM…06…16…55…EVA-3: Spacesuits to battery power11:03 AM…06…17…00…EVA-3: Airlock egress11:13 AM…06…17…10…EVA-3: Setup11:28 AM…06…17…25…EVA-3: EV1: JLE PL preps11:28 AM…06…17…25…EVA-3: EV2: JEF MLI removal11:58 AM…06…17…55…EVA-3: P6 battery replacement (4 of 6)04:43 PM…06…22…40…EVA-3: Cleanup and ingress04:48 PM…06…22…45…SSRMS maneuvers to clear SARJ05:28 PM…06…23…25…EVA-3: Airlock repressurization05:38 PM…06…23…35…Spacesuit servicing06:18 PM…07…00…15…Evening planning conference07:30 PM…07…01…27…Mission status briefing09:03 PM…07…03…00…ISS crew sleep begins09:33 PM…07…03…30…STS crew sleep begins10:00 PM…07…03…57…Daily highlights reelAdditional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:STEP-BY-STEP SUMMARY OF SPACEWALK NO. 3 VIDEO:LEFT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING UPWARD VIDEO:LEFT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING INBOARD VIDEO:LEFT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING DOWNWARD VIDEO:RIGHT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING UPWARD VIDEO:RIGHT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING INBOARD VIDEO:RIGHT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING DOWNWARD VIDEO:TUESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:CREW ANSWERS PUBLIC’S QUESTIONS FROM SPACE VIDEO:EXPOSED FACILITY RECEIVES EXPERIMENT CARRIER VIDEO:JAPANESE EXPERIMENTS UNBERTHED FROM SHUTTLE VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF FLIGHT DAY 7 ACTIVITIES VIDEO:TUESDAY MORNING FLIGHT DIRECTOR INTERVIEW VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 6 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:MONDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:REPLACEMENT COOLING PUMP PUT ON STATION VIDEO:SPARE COMMUNICATIONS ANTENNA TRANSFERRED VIDEO:SPACEWALKER HOPS ABOARD STATION ARM VIDEO:WOLF AND MARSHBURN BEGIN EVA NO. 2 VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF FLIGHT DAY 6 ACTIVITIES VIDEO:STEP-BY-STEP SUMMARY OF SPACEWALK NO. 2 VIDEO:MONDAY MORNING FLIGHT DIRECTOR INTERVIEW VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF FLIGHT DAY 6 ACTIVITIES VIDEO:STEP-BY-STEP SUMMARY OF SPACEWALK NO. 2 VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:CANADIANS IN SPACE VIDEO:SUNDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PALLET HANDED OFF TO SPACE STATION VIDEO:CARGO CARRIER UNBERTHED FROM SHUTTLE BAY VIDEO:SUNDAY MORNING FLIGHT DIRECTOR INTERVIEW VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF FLIGHT DAY 5 ACTIVITIES VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SATURDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:UPDATE ON ENDEAVOUR’S HEAT SHIELD CHECKS VIDEO:JAPANESE OUTDOOR SCIENCE PLATFORM ATTACHED VIDEO:SHUTTLE AND STATION ARMS HANDOFF SCIENCE DECK VIDEO:JAPAN’S EXPOSED FACILITY UNBERTHED FROM SHUTTLE VIDEO:THERMAL COVER JETTISONED FROM THE KIBO MODULE VIDEO:HELMET-CAMERA VIEWS AS KOPRA CLIMBS TO SHUTTLE VIDEO:TIM KOPRA EMERGES FROM AIRLOCK FOR EVA NO. 1 VIDEO:SATURDAY MORNING FLIGHT DIRECTOR INTERVIEW VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF FLIGHT DAY 4 ACTIVITIES VIDEO:STEP-BY-STEP SUMMARY OF SPACEWALK NO. 1 VIDEO:NARRATED TOUR OF ENDEAVOUR’S PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FRIDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD STATION VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR DOCKS TO THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS’ ONBOARD CAMCORDER FOOTAGE VIDEO:SHUTTLE FLIES OUT IN FRONT OF STATION VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR PERFORMS 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP VIDEO:BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF ENDEAVOUR APPROACHING VIDEO:STATION CAMERA CATCHES ENDEAVOUR’S “TI BURN” VIDEO:NARRATED PREVIEW OF RENDEZVOUS AND DOCKING VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:TUESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:THE FULL STS-127 LAUNCH EXPERIENCE VIDEO:INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA BEACH VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BANANA CREEK VIP SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD FRONT CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 VIDEO:SHUTTLE ENDEAVOUR BLASTS OFF! VIDEO:STS-127 POST-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:FOOTAGE OF FUEL TANK AFTER JETTISON VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS REACH PAD 39A VIDEO:CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS DON SPACESUITS FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:WEATHER SCRUBS LAUNCH AGAIN VIDEO:CREW ARRIVES AT PAD 39A ON MONDAY VIDEO:CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS ON MONDAY VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS SUIT UP ON MONDAY VIDEO:THUNDERSTORMS SCRUB SUNDAY’S ATTEMPT VIDEO:CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS ON SUNDAY VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS SUIT UP ON SUNDAY VIDEO:NARRATED SUMMARY SHUTTLE’S PREPARATIONS VIDEO:NARRATED SUMMARY PAYLOADS’ PREPARATIONS VIDEO:LIGHTNING STRIKES POSTPONE ENDEAVOUR LAUNCH VIDEO:FRIDAY’S PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:THURSDAY’S STATUS REPORT ON THE COUNTDOWN VIDEO:COUNTDOWN PREVIEW AND WEATHER BRIEFING VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS RETURN TO CAPE FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:NO LEAKS FOUND DURING SPECIAL TEST VIDEO:EXPLANATION OF THE HYDROGEN LEAK AND THE REPAIR VIDEO:POST-SCRUB NEWS BRIEFING VIDEO:FIRING ROOM UPDATE WITH LAUNCH DIRECTOR VIDEO:SCRUB NO. 2 DECLARED DUE TO HYDROGEN LEAK VIDEO:SUNDAY’S UPDATE FROM MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM VIDEO:LEAK POSTPONES SHUTTLE ENDEAVOUR LAUNCH VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SUN SETTING OVER PAD 39A VIDEO:ANOTHER TIME-LAPSE OF GANTRY RETRACTION VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF LAUNCH PAD TOWER ROLLBACK VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH INTERVIEW WITH MARK POLANSKY VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH INTERVIEW WITH DOUG HURLEY VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH INTERVIEW WITH CHRIS CASSIDY VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH INTERVIEW WITH JULIE PAYETTE VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH INTERVIEW WITH TOM MARSHBURN VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH INTERVIEW WITH DAVE WOLF VIDEO:THE STS-127 MISSION PREVIEW MOVIE VIDEO:THURSDAY’S PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:JAPANESE SCIENCE FACILITIES ABOARD STATION VIDEO:COUNTDOWN BEGINS TICKING FOR SATURDAY’S LAUNCH VIDEO:LAUNCH COUNTDOWN PREVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:CREW ARRIVES JUST BEFORE MIDNIGHT VIDEO:GET TO KNOW ENDEAVOUR’S ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS PRACTICE EVACUATION OF SHUTTLE VIDEO:CREW BOARDS SHUTTLE FOR PRACTICE COUNT VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS SUIT UP FOR DRESS REHEARSAL VIDEO:CREW INSPECTS CARGO IN THE PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:TRAINING SESSIONS AT LAUNCH PAD AND BUNKER VIDEO:INFORMAL CREW NEWS CONFERENCE AT LAUNCH PAD VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE FOR PRACTICE COUNTDOWN VIDEO:FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW SETS LAUNCH DATE VIDEO:PAD 39A GANTRY ENCLOSES SHUTTLE VIDEO:ROLLAROUND MOVES ENDEAVOUR TO PAD 39A VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR IS HAULED OFF LAUNCH PAD 39B VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SHUTTLE’S LAUNCH PAD SWITCH VIDEO:SHUTTLE AND STATION PROGRAM UPDATE VIDEO:THE STS-127 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW BRIEFING ON MISSION’S SPACEWALKS VIDEO:THE ASTRONAUTS’ PRE-FLIGHT NEWS BRIEFING VIDEO:PAD 39B AND ITS LAST SPACE SHUTTLE VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR’S SUNRISE ARRIVAL AT PAD 39B VIDEO:MIDNIGHT ROLLOUT FROM ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR HOISTED FOR ATTACHMENT TO TANK VIDEO:CRANE ROTATES ENDEAVOUR VERTICALLY VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR MOVES TO ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:ORION AND ARES ROCKET PROGRESS REPORT Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Crews to install station’s external science deck today BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  28. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: August 10, 2007; Updated at 7:25 p.m.The shuttle Endeavour, deftly piloted by commander Scott Kelly, glided to a gentle docking with the international space station today after a spectacular trans-Atlantic somersault to give the lab crew a chance to inspect the orbiter’s heat-shield tiles. While analysis of high-resolution digital images will take several days to complete, engineers spotted a small gouge in the heat shield tile behind the right landing gear door that may have been caused by a chunk of ice that hit the orbiter 58 seconds after launch. The tile damage is the white area to the right of the landing gear door. Credit: NASAJohn Shannon, chairman of NASA’s Mission Management Team, said the astronauts will take a close-up look at the gouge Sunday, using a 50-foot-long extension to the shuttle’s robot arm that is equipped with a powerful camera and a laser scanner to precisely measure the depth and extent of the damage.In a close-up photo snapped from the station during the pitch-around maneuver today, the damage site looked relatively minor and not as extensive as past incidents of tile damage discovered after landings that caused no problems during re-entry. But in the post-Columbia era, NASA managers take no chances when it comes to heat shield damage and Shannon would not predict how the assessment might turn out.”We have a rich flight history of tile damage, some of which is more significant looking than what we have right here,” Shannon said. “But instead of guessing, we’ll go and get the right characterization of exactly what the damage is and then run the thermal models and then we’ll know. In the past, we didn’t even know we had damage and we flew back home (safely). So what I would tell you is, we’re going to do all the work required to understand it and if something is required, we’ll go do that. I would not even venture to guess what the probability is we would have to go repair this.”The now-standard post-Columbia rendezvous pitch maneuver, or RPM, began at 12:56 p.m. with Endeavour about 600 feet below the station as the two craft passed just off the northeast coast of Brazil. The slow-motion back flip ended about 10 minutes later above northwest Africa. Flying from the shuttle’s aft flight deck, Kelly then guided Endeavour through a slow pitch up to a point about 300 feet directly in front of the station before driving in for a precision docking at 2:02 p.m.”Capture confirmed, Endeavour has pulled into port at the international space station,” said mission control commentator Rob Navias.A few seconds later, Expedition 15 commander Fyodor Yurchikhin rang the ship’s bell mounted in the Destiny laboratory module and formally announced Endeavour’s arrival.”Endeavour arrive to ISS station,” he said in English. “Welcome on board.”It took the astronauts about two hours to firmly lock the two spacecraft together, carry out leak checks and open hatches leading into the Destiny laboratory where Yurchikhin, Oleg Kotov and Clay Anderson were waiting to welcome Kelly, pilot Charles Hobaugh, Tracy Caldwell, flight engineer Rick Mastracchio, Canadian flier Dafydd Williams, Al Drew and educator-astronaut Barbara Morgan aboard.Sporting broad smiles, the two crews hugged and shook hands amid laughter and popping camera flashes, enjoying a few moments of camaraderie before a mandatory safety briefing from Yurchikhin. Teacher-turned-astronaut Morgan, Christa McAuliffe’s backup in the original Teacher in Space program, floated through the laboratory operating a movie camera for an educational video, grinning broadly and clearly enjoying herself.A few minutes earlier, before the shuttle crew floated into the station, Caldwell unlimbered Endeavour’s 50-foot-long robot arm and latched onto a 5,000-pound solar array truss segment in the shuttle’s cargo bay. After the safety briefing, she moved back to the shuttle’s flight deck and used the robot arm to carefully pull the boxy S5 truss from its perch in the cargo bay, starting shortly before 5 p.m.A half hour later, Hobaugh, operating the space station’s robot arm from a work station inside Destiny, locked onto the truss segment and Caldwell disengaged the shuttle arm. Hobaugh then maneuvered it to an overnight park position near the right side of the station’s main solar power truss. If all goes well, the segment will be bolted to the far right end of the main truss Saturday during a spacewalk by Mastracchio and Williams. Both men plan to spend the night in the station’s Quest airlock module at a reduced pressure of 10.2 pounds per square inch to help purge nitrogen from their blood in preparation for the spacewalk Saturday.Late today, the astronauts activated a new shuttle-to-station power transfer system, or SSPTS, and Endeavour began drawing 6.5 kilowatts of electricity from the station’s solar power grid. Using station electricity, the shuttle crew can reduce the consumption of hydrogen and oxygen by the ship’s three electricity producing fuel cells. If the new system works as expected, NASA managers are expected to extend Endeavour’s mission by three days and add a fourth spacewalk. A decision could come as early as Sunday.Sunday, the crew’s flight day five, is also the day the astronauts will carry out a focused inspection of the shuttle’s heat shield to measure the extent of the gouge on the underside of the shuttle. During the climb to space Wednesday, a camera mounted on the shuttle’s external tank spotted about nine small bits of foam debris falling away, including three that may have struck the orbiter. The debris in question was the second one, seen at about 58 seconds. A closer view of the tile damage. Credit: NASAThe best close-up picture from today’s RPM shows an area of white in roughly the center of a 6-by-6-inch black tile midway between the shuttle’s right side main landing gear door and the right-side door that covers a propellant feedline inlet. Shannon said the area of damage on the tile in question appears to measure less than three inches across.On Thursday, ascent video showed a spray of whitish material streaming away from the shuttle’s underside after the impact, presumably from a piece of foam that hit the belly of the orbiter. Today, based on analysis of radar data, engineers believe the debris may have been the remnant of a small chunk of ice.”If you remember yesterday, I said we had one debris event where we saw a streak, or potentially a spray of some material from the underside of the vehicle, at 58 seconds,” Shannon said. “That was tracked by radar and the ballistic coefficient, or how that particle was tracked, looked more like ice than foam. Yesterday, we were thinking it might be foam. Today, that radar data says it looked like ice and we’re going to continue to go look at that. It perked up our ears a little bit because ice is much more dense, of course, than foam and it can do more damage to tile. … So that was interesting.”Describing a close-up picture from today’s rendezvous pitch maneuver, Shannon said it as difficult to assess the extent of the damage “because it’s just not a great picture and there’s a little bit of shading on here. We think potentially the black streak in the middle of that white hole is just a shadow. But you can almost see some color where that tile comes up against some other tile. Potentially, that color is the material on the edge of the tile at the very base of the aluminum structure, It’s called filler bar material. We don’t know that for a fact, but it’s certainly got our attention and we’re looking at it.”Columbia was brought down during re-entry Feb. 1, 2003, by a gaping hole in one of the left wing’s leading edge panels caused by the impact of a briefcase-size piece of foam debris during launch. Among NASA’s post-Columbia upgrades are heat shield repair techniques that could be used by spacewalkers to fix relatively minor pits and dings. The options range from application of a black “emittance wash” paint-like material to restore lost heat rejection capability, to a thick goo-like material known as STA-54 that can fill in large voids. A third option is to screw on a carbon composite overlay, depending on the extent of the damage.The Endeavour astronauts are trained for all such repair techniques but Shannon said any such talk is premature until all the data are in.”What does this mean? I don’t know at this point,” he said. “On flight day five (Sunday), we had preplanned a time in the timeline when we could do a focused inspection and we will do that on this spot. … They will take the orbiter boom sensor system with the laser on it, they wlll put it underneath the vehicle and get a very high fidelity model of exactly what the damage is. It’s too hard to tell from a two-dimensional picture with different shading to tell if this gouge is deep or it’s not deep.”So we’ll put the laser on it and we’ll get an exact size of it, we’ll get a cloud model of exactly what the gouge looks like. And then we have extremely accurate thermal models to say given this particular gouge what would that mean for re-entry. And that’s the work that’s going to go on.”Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:SHUTTLE ASTRONAUTS WELCOMED ABOARD STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE DOCKS TO THE STATION AS SEEN LIVE VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR AND STATION FLY INTO ORBITAL SUNRISE VIDEO:SHUTTLE DOES BACKFLIP BELOW THE STATION VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR INTERCEPTS THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE TI BURN SEEN FROM STATION VIDEO:ANIMATED PREVIEW OF DOCKING VIDEO:FIRST IN-SPACE COMMENTS FROM BARBARA MORGAN VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SHUTTLE INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 2 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE FULL LAUNCH EXPERIENCE VIDEO:JETTISONED EXTERNAL TANK FALLS AWAY VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: COMPLEX 41 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: KSC RUNWAY VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD FRONT VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-12 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR BLASTS OFF! VIDEO:CREW’S LAUNCH MORNING PHOTO IN DINING ROOM VIDEO:UPCLOSE FOOTAGE OF THE GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:TUESDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:STS-118 PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:MONDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SUNDAY COUNTDOWN AND WEATHER UPDATE VIDEO:CREW ARRIVES AT KENNEDY SPACE CENTER VIDEO:COMMENTS FROM EACH OF THE ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: SCOTT KELLY VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: CHARLIE HOBAUGH VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: TRACY CALDWELL VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: RICK MASTRACCHIO VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: DAVE WILLIAMS VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: BARBARA MORGAN VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: ALVIN DREW MORE:John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Endeavour to depart the space station today BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  29. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: November 4, 2007The Discovery astronauts bid a tearful farewell to their space station crewmates today, hugging and sharing a few final words before closing hatches and making preparations for undocking early Monday.For Clay Anderson, who was launched to the station last June and who’s flying home aboard Discovery after 152 days in space, the moment was especially emotional. Floating in the Destiny laboratory module with his shuttle and station crewmates, Anderson thanked flight controllers in the United States and Russia, stopping three times to collect himself.”Today’s my last day aboard the international space station, Alpha,” he said. “Five months ago, i was lying on my back in the middeck of the orbiter Atlantis preparing to launch into orbit for the first time and wondering what the heck I’d gotten myself into. And now I’m poised to return to Earth after having served very proudly on board this magnificent complex as part of two expedition and three shuttle crews.”And as my time draws to a close here, I’m filled with a lot of different emotions. I have a lot of blood, sweat and tears that I’ve left on board the international space station, it’s a very wonderful place. So I want to take this time to thank each and every one of you. You’ve been my special family down there on the ground for quite some time and as is true for families on Earth, I sincerely believe we’ve all created some very fond memories.”You all kept me safe, you’ve shown me unwavering patience and professionalism… And you’ve all overlooked my shortcomings and it’s my hope that maybe you’ve even had a few laughs along the way… What I’d like to say is what we are doing here is very important for all of human kind. It’s worth the risk, it’s worth the cost and you folks on the ground are the people who make it happen. So I want you to take pride in your work and constantly look toward the heavens, for it is there you will see your future.”For all the flight control, training and engineering teams in Houston, Huntsville and Moscow… I say thank you,” Anderson concluded. “You are indeed the best and the brightest that our world has to offer.””Hey Clay, we appreciate the words,” astronaut Kevin Ford said from mission control as flight controllers applauded. “Great work on your expedition and we’re looking forward to having you back here.”Ford then put lead station flight director Derek Hassmann on the line.”It’s really, really great to see everybody together there in the lab,” he said. “I just wanted to echo Kevin’s comments, it was an honor and a privilege to watch you guys do your work. What an unbelievably successful mission. … Great job, guys. Thanks.”Discovery carried Anderson’s replacement, Dan Tani, into orbit and shuttle commander Pam Melroy teared up herself as she welcomed Anderson and said farewell to Tani and his new crewmates, station commander Peggy Whitson and cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko.”I guess this is the time when Discovery officially welcomes Clay with open arms to our crew,” Melroy said. “We can’t wait to bring you home to your family and we’re very happy to have you. It’s not even a question of fitting in, because our crews have matched so well. There’s been a lot of laughter and a lot of fun and a lot of really hard work over the last few docked days.”And it’s also our time to say farewell to Dan… he told me not to do this (cry)… Dan has brought us so many wonderful memories and so many wonderful moments. We’re going to miss you terribly. We promise we’ll send somebody to come pick you up and bring you home. And to Peggy, thank you, it’s just been an honor and a privilege to share command of this mission with you. Our personal relationship has just made it all that much better. And Yuri, thank you so much for all the help you gave to us as well.”Saying “we’re family now,” Melroy embraced Whitson and the two crews shared a few final smiles and hugs before the shuttle astronauts floated back aboard Discovery for good.If all goes well, Discovery will undock from the space station at 5:32 a.m. Monday. Landing is scheduled for 1:02 p.m. Wednesday, Anderson’s 15th wedding anniversary.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:FAREWELL CEREMONY BETWEEN SHUTTLE AND ISS CREWS VIDEO:SUNDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 12 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:POST-SPACEWALK MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE SOLAR ARRAY IS FULLY DEPLOYED AT LAST VIDEO:PARAZYNSKI INSTALLS FIRST CUFFLINK VIDEO:THE SPACEWALK BEGINS VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 11 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FRIDAY’S STATUS BRIEFING AND SPACEWALK PREVIEW VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 10 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:THURSDAY’S STATUS BRIEFING AND SPACEWALK PREVIEW VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 9 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:CREW NEWS BRIEFING WITH U.S., ITALY, RUSSIA VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 8 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:TUESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SOLAR ARRAY WING TEARS DURING DEPLOYMENT VIDEO:FIRST SOLAR ARRAY IS SUCCESSFULLY UNFURLED VIDEO:HOUSTON BEGINS SOLAR ARRAYS DEPLOY SEQUENCE VIDEO:SPARE POWER SWITCHING UNIT INSTALLED VIDEO:INSPECTIONS OF PORT-SIDE ROTARY JOINT VIDEO:RADIATOR UNFOLDED FROM THE P6 TRUSS VIDEO:THE ASTRONAUTS PAUSE FOR QUICK PHOTOS VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS REMOVE SHROUDS FROM P6 BOXES VIDEO:P6 TRUSS CAPTURED CLAW-LIKE INSTALL LATCH VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS HELP GUIDE P6 TRUSS INTO PLACE VIDEO:DOUG WHEELOCK EMERGES FROM AIRLOCK FOR EVA VIDEO:ROBOT ARM MOVES TRUSS FROM OVERNIGHT PARK SPOT VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF P6 TRUSS INSTALLATION VIDEO:PREVIEW OF TUESDAY’S SPACEWALK VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 7 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:MONDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:ANOTHER RADIATOR DEPLOYED FROM THE S1 TRUSS VIDEO:RADIATOR DEPLOYED FROM STARBOARD 1 TRUSS VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS HAVE SOME FUN IN HARMONY VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY ABC NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY NBC NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY CNN VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF RADIATOR DEPLOYS VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF PORT 6 HANDOFF VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 6 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:POST-SPACEWALK MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:ROBOT ARM GRAPPLE BASE INSTALLED ON HARMONY VIDEO:STATION CABLING FOR P6 TRUSS CONFIGURED VIDEO:TANI COLLECTS SAMPLES OF DEBRIS IN ROTARY JOINT VIDEO:TANI DISCOVERS UNKNOWN DEBRIS INSIDE ROTARY JOINT VIDEO:THE PORT 6 TRUSS DETACHED FROM THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS UNBOLT THE PORT 6 TRUSS VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF PORT 6 REMOVAL VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SUNDAY’S SPACEWALK VIDEO:BIOGRAPHY MOVIE ON DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:BIOGRAPHY MOVIE ON EXPEDITION 16 CREW VIDEO:BIOGRAPHY ON NEW EXPEDITION 16 MEMBER DAN TANI VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY CBS NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY FOX NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY WHAM-TV VIDEO:SATURDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ENTER HARMONY FOR FIRST TIME VIDEO:CREW COMMENTS FROM INSIDE HARMONY VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:POST-EVA MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:FIRST STS-120 SPACEWALK CONCLUDES VIDEO:ROBOT ARM INSTALLS HARMONY ON THE STATION VIDEO:HARMONY MODULE LIFTED OUT OF PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:S-BAND ANTENNA STOWED IN DISCOVERY’S BAY VIDEO:WHEELOCK RIDES STATION ARM WITH ANTENNA VIDEO:MISSION STS-120’S SPACEWALK NO. 1 BEGINS VIDEO:ANIMATED PREVIEW OF HARMONY INSTALLATION VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF SHUTTLE PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:HARMONY’S PRE-LAUNCH PREPS AT THE CAPE VIDEO:BACKGROUND INFO ON HARMONY MODULE VIDEO:PREVIEW OF FRIDAY’S SPACEWALK VIDEO:THURSDAY MANAGEMENT TEAM NEWS BRIEFING VIDEO:POST-DOCKING MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:INSPECTION BOOM HANDED BETWEEN ROBOT ARMS VIDEO:SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD THE STATION VIDEO:RING BETWEEN THE DOCKING PORTS RETRACTED VIDEO:REPLAY OF DOCKING FROM PAYLOAD BAY CAMERAS VIDEO:SHUTTLE DISCOVERY DOCKS TO THE STATION VIDEO:DISCOVERY PERFORMS 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP VIDEO:SHUTTLE APPROACHES STATION FROM BELOW VIDEO:NARRATED PREVIEW OF THE DOCKING VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:BRIEFING ON LAUNCH IMAGERY AND TANK’S PERFORMANCE VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH VIDEO:DISCOVERY’S LAUNCH AS SEEN LIVE VIDEO:EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA FROM LIFTOFF TO ORBIT VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: KSC RUNWAY VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 041 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-12 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-15 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 VIDEO:THE CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR THE PAD VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS SUITS UP ON LAUNCH MORNING VIDEO:A LOOK BACK AT SHUTTLE DISCOVERY’S HISTORY VIDEO:PAD 39A’S ROTATING GANTRY MOVED BACK VIDEO:INTERVIEW CLIPS WITH THE ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:MONDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:SUNDAY COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SATURDAY COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:WATCH THE CREW’S ARRIVAL FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:NEWS CONFERENCE AFTER FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW VIDEO:SHUTTLE DISCOVERY ROLLS TO LAUNCH PAD 39A VIDEO:CRANE HOISTS DISCOVERY FOR MATING TO TANK VIDEO:DISCOVERY MOVED TO THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:HYDRAULIC SEALS REPLACED ON LANDING GEAR STRUT VIDEO:FUEL TANK ATTACHED TO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS VIDEO:FOAM REMOVED FROM FUEL TANK FEEDLINE BRACKETS VIDEO:STS-120 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW OF THE MISSION’S FIVE SPACEWALKS VIDEO:DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS MEET THE PRESS VIDEO:BRIEFING ON SHUTTLE AND ISS PROGRAMS MORE:Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Shuttle boss confident suspect wing panels safe BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  30. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: August 15, 2007Making a routine inspection of his spacesuit gloves, a recently implemented safety procedure because of damage found after a December shuttle flight, astronaut Rick Mastracchio spotted a small hole in one of the outer layers of his left glove, prompting mission control to order him back to the space station’s airlock as a precaution.Mission control commentator Kyle Herring said Mastracchio was not in any danger and that his suit was not leaking. But the flight rules require a return to the airlock if any penetration is seen.As it turned out, Mastracchio and fellow spacewalker Clay Anderson were in the final stages of a planned six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk, running well ahead of schedule. Despite the early termination of Mastracchio’s excursion, the astronauts accomplished all of their major objectives and the only task left undone was the retrieval of two space exposure experiments. They will be collected during a future spacewalk.The suit problem cropped up around 3 p.m. when Mastracchio was asked to check his gloves. The periodic checks are a now standard part of every NASA spacewalk after damage was seen during a December shuttle mission.”Before we get too far, let’s get a glove check on you,” spacewalk coordinator Tracy Caldwell radioed from Endeavour’s flight deck.”OK. My left glove looks clean and unchanged in terms of RTV damage,” Mastracchio said, referring to the outermost layer of the glove. “A lot of the (garble) I picked up is kind of gone. The right glove… ah, there might be a little more RTV missing between the thumb and forefinger but the Vectran looks… a little bit of RTV, just a small dot of RTV missing on the middle finger. A very small piece.””OK, TC, I’m at the transponder, I’m just trying to figure out how I’m going to attack this,” Anderson chimed in, pressing ahead with his own work.”You take your time, Clay,” Caldwell replied.”There might been a little bit of RTV damage on my right thumb,” Mastracchio continued. “Just kind of looks like a, I don’t know, like a scratch, a couple of missing threads maybe, I don’t know.”A few moments later, looking at his left glove again, Mastracchio reported “I do have a little bit of a hole in the Vectran.”Vectran is a widely used, manufactured fiber noted for its strength, flexibility and tolerance to extreme temperatures. Vectran is the second of five layers of material making up an astronaut’s spacesuit glove.Examining his glove, Mastracchio said “I can actually see shiny metal fibers underneath it, I see the surface under the Vectran, in other words.”A few moments later, after examining the glove via television, astronaut Shannon Walker in mission control told Mastracchio to head back to the Quest airlock module.”Tracy, we need Clay to stand by,” Walker said. “And because we do have a hole in the Vectran, we’re going to have to terminate Rick’s activity today. So we need him to head back to the airlock and do the terminate procedure in the checklist.””OK,” Mastracchio replied, sounding disappointed. Later, back in the airlock, Caldwell asked how he was doing.”I’m fine,” Mastracchio replied. “Looking out the hatch. Wishing I was out there.”Anderson, meanwhile, completed the transponder retrieval and then joined Mastracchio in the Quest module.The spacewalk, the third of four planned for Endeavour’s mission, began at 10:37 a.m. Riding on the station’s robot arm, Mastracchio removed an S-band antenna assembly from the P6 solar array truss atop the central Unity module and moved it down to its permanent location on the P1 segment of the lab’s main solar array truss. Anderson installed a new transponder and signal processor as part of an S-band communications system upgrade.Flight controllers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston then verified the electrical connections and activated heaters, saying the equipment appeared to be operating normally.The astronauts then moved two equipment carts from the port, or left, side of the robot arm’s mobile transporter, to the right side. The transporter and the so-called CETA carts move like a train along tracks on the front face of the solar array truss. The carts had to be moved to the right side of the transporter to permit the robot arm to reach the left-most worksite in October when a visiting shuttle crew plans to move the stowed P6 solar array segment to the left end of the power truss.Mastracchio and Anderson were wrapping up that work when the glove problem was reported. After joining Mastracchio in the airlock, Anderson shut the hatch and commander Scott Kelly began airlock re-pressurization at 4:05 p.m. for an official duration of five hours and 28 minutes.This was the 91st spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998, the 14th so far this year, the third for Mastracchio and the second for Anderson. Seventy two men and women representing the United States, Russia, Canada, Japan, Germany, France and Sweden have now logged 562 hours and 57 minutes building and maintaining the international lab complex. The Endeavour crew’s total through three spacewalk is 18 hours and 13 minutes.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 3 VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 7 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 7 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:EDUCATIONAL EVENT WITH CHILDREN IN IDAHO VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEW WITH ABC NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEW WITH CBS NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEW WITH CNN VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEW WITH NBC NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEW WITH FOX NEWS VIDEO:STOWAGE PLATFORM ATTACHED TO THE STATION VIDEO:THE PLATFORM IS RAISED OUT OF PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:SHUTTLE ARM GRAPPLES THE STOWAGE PLATFORM VIDEO:STOWAGE PLATFORM INSTALLATION EXPLAINED VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 6 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SHANNON GIVES UPDATE ON TILE DAMAGE ANALYSIS VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 6 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 2 VIDEO:SPACEWALK NO. 2 BEGINS VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS UNBOLT THE FAILED GYROSCOPE VIDEO:THE FAILED GYRO IS REMOVED FROM THE STATION VIDEO:NEW GYRO IS RETRIEVED FROM SHUTTLE PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS BRING NEW GYRO UP TO THE STATION VIDEO:THE NEW GYRO IS INSTALLED AND BOLTED DOWN VIDEO:FAILED GYRO PUT ON STATION STOWAGE PLATFORM VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:HURRICANE FLOSSIE ON SUNDAY EVENING VIDEO:CREW INSPECTIONS SHUTTLE TILE DAMAGE VIDEO:INSPECTION BOOM FOR DAMAGE CHECK VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 5 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 4 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SPACEWALK NO. 1 BEGINS VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS REMOVE LAUNCH LOCKS ON S5 TRUSS VIDEO:ROBOT ARM INSTALLS STARBOARD 5 TRUSS ON STATION VIDEO:STARBOARD 5 TRUSS BOLTED TO THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:TRUSS’S GRAPPLE FIXTURE REMOVED VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 1 VIDEO:STARBOARD 5 TRUSS INSTALLATION EXPLAINED VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 3 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:STARBOARD 5 TRUSS PULLED OUT OF PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:TRUSS HANDED FROM SHUTTLE ARM TO STATION ARM VIDEO:SHUTTLE ASTRONAUTS WELCOMED ABOARD STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE DOCKS TO THE STATION AS SEEN LIVE VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR AND STATION FLY INTO ORBITAL SUNRISE VIDEO:SHUTTLE DOES BACKFLIP BELOW THE STATION VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR INTERCEPTS THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE TI BURN SEEN FROM STATION VIDEO:ANIMATED PREVIEW OF DOCKING VIDEO:FIRST IN-SPACE COMMENTS FROM BARBARA MORGAN VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SHUTTLE INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 2 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE FULL LAUNCH EXPERIENCE VIDEO:JETTISONED EXTERNAL TANK FALLS AWAY VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: COMPLEX 41 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: KSC RUNWAY VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD FRONT VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-12 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR BLASTS OFF! VIDEO:CREW’S LAUNCH MORNING PHOTO IN DINING ROOM VIDEO:UPCLOSE FOOTAGE OF THE GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:TUESDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:STS-118 PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:MONDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SUNDAY COUNTDOWN AND WEATHER UPDATE VIDEO:CREW ARRIVES AT KENNEDY SPACE CENTER VIDEO:COMMENTS FROM EACH OF THE ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: SCOTT KELLY VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: CHARLIE HOBAUGH VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: TRACY CALDWELL VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: RICK MASTRACCHIO VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: DAVE WILLIAMS VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: BARBARA MORGAN VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: ALVIN DREW MORE:STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Hurricane-shortened spacewalk about to start BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  31. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: June 27, 2006Commander Steve Lindsey and his six crewmates – pilot Mark Kelly, flight engineer Lisa Nowak, spacewalkers Piers Sellers and Mike Fossum, Stephanie Wilson and European astronaut Thomas Reiter – flew to the Kennedy Space Center today for final preparations before launch Saturday on a space station servicing mission.Arriving aboard two-seat T-38 jet trainers, the astronauts touched down on the shuttle’s 3-mile-long runway at mid morning, landing one at a time in a staggered sequence.”We’re really excited to be here, ready to go do this for real,” Lindsey told reporters at the runway. “We’ve been training for a long time, we’re as prepared as we’re going to be. The vehicle is ready and everything’s looking ‘go.’ So weather permitting, which I’m pretty confident in, we’re going to be airborne on July 1.”Discovery’s launch from pad 39B is targeted for 3:48:37 p.m. Saturday, roughly the moment Earth’s rotation carries the shuttle into the plane of the space station’s orbit. Afternoon showers are expected, but NASA has not yet issued an official forecast.”I’m hoping the weather’s going to improve a little bit in the next few days and we’ll get off on time,” said Sellers. “It’s great to be here at last.”Discovery’s flight is only the second post-Columbia mission and the first launch in nearly a year as NASA has struggled to overcome ongoing problems with the foam insulation on the shuttle’s external fuel tank.The goals of the 115th shuttle mission are to deliver more than 5,000 pounds of supplies and equipment to the space station; to repair a stalled robot arm transporter needed for continued assembly; and to deliver European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Reiter to the outpost as a full-time crew member.Reiter is on board Discovery under a commercial contract between the European and Russian space agencies. He will join station commander Pavel Vinogradov and flight engineer Jeff Williams for a long-duration stay aboard the outpost, boosting crew size back to three for the first time since the immediate aftermath of the 2003 Columbia disaster.”I’m the one who will be left behind on the station,” Reiter joked today. “After years and years of training, I think this is a remarkable moment. I think we all are confident our launch will signify the continuation of assembly of the station, returning to a three-man crew and utilizing the station for its (intended) purpose.”Discovery’s countdown to launch is scheduled to begin at 5 p.m. Wednesday.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:RATIONALE FOR LAUNCH EXPLAINED AUDIO:LISTEN TO EXPLANATION VIDEO:CREW TALKS ABOUT RISKS OF SPACEFLIGHT VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS DEPART QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD VIDEO:CREW DONS LAUNCH AND ENTRY SPACESUITS VIDEO:BREAKFAST ON PRACTICE COUNTDOWN DAY VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S PAD CHAT WITH CREW VIDEO:CREW ARRIVES FOR PRACTICE COUNTDOWN VIDEO:COMMENTS FROM THE COMMANDER VIDEO:SHUTTLE MISSION PREVIEW VIDEO:STATION ACTIVITIES ON STS-121 VIDEO:PREVIEW OF DISCOVERY’S SPACEWALKS VIDEO:THE ASTRONAUTS MEET THE PRESS VIDEO: SHUTTLE AND ISS PROGRAM PERSPECTIVEDIAL-UP: and BROADBAND: and Telescopes.comLargest selection and the best prices anywhere in the world. Free shipping on select items. is the largest dealer of both Meade and Celestron Telescopes. Visit or call toll free 1-800-303-5873.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Discovery departs hangarSPACEFLIGHT NOW

  32. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: March 19, 2009Spacewalkers Steven Swanson and Richard Arnold attached the S6 solar array truss segment to the international space station today, plugged in power and data cables, unlocked a set of radiator panels and coaxed two mast canisters and blanket boxes into position for array deployment Friday.They had to apply a bit of elbow grease to get the mast canisters and their beta gimbal assemblies rotated into position and in one case, only three of four support masts could be locked in place. But that was sufficient and mission control told the astronauts to press on.”We can confirm that we have the other three confirmed locked,” astronaut Joseph Acaba radioed from inside Discovery. “So we show ourselves in a good config.””We did copy all of that discussion,” replied Lucia McCullough from Houston. “We are good to proceed.”Swanson and Arnold then rotated solar array blanket boxes into position for deployment, removed thermal covers from electrical components and jettisoned them overboard as planned.Before wrapping up the excursion, Swanson asked to double-check the unlatched support bar and to take pictures if he was unable to coax it into its final position.”I tried to pull that pin out,” he reported. “It did not move. I tried to get a little leverage on it and I still could not get it to move. And so it seems to be just kind of stuck in a halfway spot.”Flight controllers re-confirmed the array canister was firmly supported with three locked bars and the astronauts began collecting their tools before heading back to the airlock.The final task on today’s agenda was deployment of a folded set of radiator panels the spacewalkers unlatched earlier. The radiator appeared to unfold normally.Swanson and Arnold began repressurizing the space station’s Quest airlock module at 7:23 p.m. EDT, officially ending the successful spacewalk.”Swanee and Ricky, you guys just did a fantastic job today. Right now, we’re looking at about six hours, so it was really good work,” Acaba radioed. “And Houston, thanks for all your support. Couldn’t have done it without you.””Hey, we just echoed that,” McCullough called from mission control. “That was outstanding. For you and the rest of the combined crew, we’re delighted to accept delivery and installation of the S6 truss.”Said space station commander MIke Fincke: “I just wanted to say welcome back aboard the space station. It’s a lot bigger than when you left it. Great job out there. You guys were outstanding. Thanks for the hard work.”Today’s spacewalk began at 1:16 p.m. and ran six hours and seven minutes, ending 23 minutes ahead of schedule. This was the 121st spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance, the second so far this year and the first of three planned by Discovery’s crew. Total EVA construction time now stands at 762 hours and three minutes, or nearly 32 days.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:WALKTHROUGH OF SPACEWALK NO. 1 PLAN VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF THE STARBOARD 6 TRUSS PAYLOAD VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF TRUSS INSTALLATION VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF S6 TRUSS UNBERTHING VIDEO:NARRATED TOUR OF DISCOVERY’S PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:TUESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD STATION VIDEO:SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY DOCKS TO SPACE STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE’S POINT OF VIEW DURING BACKFLIP VIDEO:DISCOVERY PERFORMS 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF RENDEZVOUS AND DOCKING VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:MONDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:MONDAY’S MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM UPDATE VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:THE FULL STS-119 LAUNCH EXPERIENCE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: FRONT CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA BEACH VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: THE VIP VIEWING SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY BLASTS OFF VIDEO:SHUTTLE’S CREW MODULE HATCH CLOSED FOR FLIGHT VIDEO:MISSION SPECIALIST STEVE SWANSON BOARDS VIDEO:PILOT TONY ANTONELLI BOARDS DISCOVERY VIDEO:COMMANDER LEE ARCHAMBAULT BOARDS VIDEO:CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS DON SPACESUITS FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SUNRISE AT LAUNCH PAD 39A VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF HYDROGEN ACCESS ARM RETRACTION VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SATURDAY NIGHT’S GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:SATURDAY’S PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:FRIDAY’S SHUTTLE AND WEATHER UPDATE BRIEFING VIDEO:POST-SCRUB NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:DISCOVERY IN THE PREDAWN DARKESS VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S ROLLBACK OF PAD GANTRY VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF PAD GANTRY ROLLING BACK VIDEO:THE PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE IN FLORIDA FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:POST-ARRIVAL COMMENTS FROM THE CREW VIDEO:FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:SECOND LAUNCH POSTPONEMENT BRIEFING VIDEO:NARRATED MISSION OVERVIEW MOVIE VIDEO:MEET SHUTTLE DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH COMMANDER LEE ARCHAMBAULT VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH PILOT TONY ANTONELLI VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS1 JOE ACABA VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS2 STEVE SWANSON VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS3 RICKY ARNOLD VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS4 JOHN PHILLIPS VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS5 KOICHI WAKATA VIDEO:NASA OFFICIALS ANNOUNCE LAUNCH DELAY VIDEO:SPACE STATION’S VIBRATIONS DURING REBOOST VIDEO:INFORMAL NEWS CONFERENCE AT RUNWAY VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE FOR PRACTICE COUNTDOWN VIDEO:DISCOVERY POSITIONED ATOP PAD 39A VIDEO:EARLY MORNING ROLLOUT FROM THE VAB VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY ARRIVING AT PAD 39A VIDEO:DISCOVERY HOISTED FOR ATTACHMENT TO TANK VIDEO:CRANE ROTATES DISCOVERY VERTICALLY VIDEO:DISCOVERY MOVES TO ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:NOSE WHEEL LANDING GEAR RETRACTED VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY GOING VERTICAL VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF ASSEMBLY BUILDING CRANE WORK VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY’S TRIP TO VAB VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF PAYLOAD’S MOVE VIDEO:SHUTTLE AND STATION PROGRAM UPDATE VIDEO:STS-119 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW BRIEFING ON MISSION’S SPACEWALKS VIDEO:THE ASTRONAUTS’ PRE-FLIGHT NEWS BRIEFING MORE:STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Spacewalkers finish part of their Saturday to-do list BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  33. “This, of course, was the third and final spacewalk for the mission. So tomorrow will be largely an off-duty day for the crew. The day after tomorrow, on Wednesday, the crew will be preparing for the final transfers of equipment and logistics supplies as well as hatch closure and subsequently, undocking.”Undocking is targeted for 3:53 p.m. Wednesday. If all goes well, Discovery will land back at the Kennedy Space Center around 1:44 p.m. Saturday.”Overall, we’re absolutely thrilled and very happy that we were able to accomplish what we did,” Alibaruho said. “We certainly accomplished our highest priority objectives and certainly the ones that we were most concerned about were executed flawlessly.”Alibaruho said the station’s complex water recycling system, including a repaired urine processing assembly, appears to be working normally after installation of a new distillation centrifuge unit Friday. After initial tests and checkout, the astronauts ran a water sample through the system overnight and no problems were reported.”We had great success with the operation of the urine processor assembly,” Alibaruho said. “We were able to perform the full processing cycle of about 70 pounds of urine that has been washed through the urine processor and has been converted into clean water. So we’re very excited about that.”The new distillation assembly appears to have performed very well, with no anomalies. In fact, we got a report from the crew that all-around performance of that unit was much better from a vibration perspective and an acoustic perspective. So that gives us some indication that that new distillation assembly that we flew up is in good shape and quite healthy. So we’re very excited about that activity today.”The water recycling system is designed to convert condensate and urine into potable water for drinking, crew hygiene and oxygen generation. The urine processor was installed during a shuttle flight last November, but the vacuum distillation assembly centrifuge malfunctioned and eventually failed.Getting the recycling system up and running is critical for NASA’s plans to boost station crew size from three to six in late May. While the station has enough fresh water to support six astronauts in the near term, recycling is required for long-term support.”What’s next on the plate for checkout of our advanced life support systems equipment is basically to take end-of-mission water samples from various places in the water recycling loop, from some of the sensor areas that look at water quality, we take a sample from the actual galley water dispenser, the ambient temperature line and the hot temperature line, as well as the rack interface area where we make the connection of the water recycler rack to the main water buss in the U.S. laboratory,” Alibaruho.”So we’ll take about four samples, four water samples, for return home,” he said. “Those will be analyzed by specialists to determine if the whole system can be cleared for use by the crew. So those water samples were a very important mission objective for us in addition to the installation of the (S6 solar array) truss and deployment of the solar arrays, of course.”He said it likely will take about a month to complete analysis of the returned water samples. Assuming they meet the required standards, the station crew will be cleared to begin using recycled water.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:SUNDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:NEWS MEDIA INTERVIEWS WITH CREW VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 7 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SATURDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:WALKTHROUGH OF SPACEWALK NO. 2 PLAN VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 6 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FRIDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:NEWS MEDIA INTERVIEWS WITH CREW VIDEO:SECOND SOLAR WING FULLY DEPLOYED VIDEO:SECOND SOLAR WING DEPLOYED HALF-WAY VIDEO:FIRST SOLAR WING FULLY DEPLOYED VIDEO:FIRST SOLAR WING DEPLOYED HALF-WAY VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF SOLAR ARRAY DEPLOYMENT VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:THURSDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SPACEWALKER STEVE SWANSON RELEASES LOCKS VIDEO:STARBOARD 6 TRUSS ATTACHED TO THE STATION VIDEO:WALKTHROUGH OF SPACEWALK NO. 1 PLAN VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF THE STARBOARD 6 TRUSS PAYLOAD VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF TRUSS INSTALLATION VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:POWER TRUSS HANDED FROM SHUTTLE TO STATION VIDEO:STARBOARD 6 TRUSS HOISTED FROM PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF S6 TRUSS UNBERTHING VIDEO:NARRATED TOUR OF DISCOVERY’S PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:TUESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD STATION VIDEO:SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY DOCKS TO SPACE STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE’S POINT OF VIEW DURING BACKFLIP VIDEO:DISCOVERY PERFORMS 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF RENDEZVOUS AND DOCKING VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:MONDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:MONDAY’S MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM UPDATE VIDEO:PREVIEW ANIMATION OF HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:THE FULL STS-119 LAUNCH EXPERIENCE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: FRONT CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA BEACH VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: THE VIP VIEWING SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-11 TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE VIDEO:INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH VIDEO:PAYLOAD BAY DOORS OPENED IN ORBIT VIDEO:SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY BLASTS OFF VIDEO:SHUTTLE’S CREW MODULE HATCH CLOSED FOR FLIGHT VIDEO:MISSION SPECIALIST STEVE SWANSON BOARDS VIDEO:PILOT TONY ANTONELLI BOARDS DISCOVERY VIDEO:COMMANDER LEE ARCHAMBAULT BOARDS VIDEO:CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS DON SPACESUITS FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SUNRISE AT LAUNCH PAD 39A VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF HYDROGEN ACCESS ARM RETRACTION VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SATURDAY NIGHT’S GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:SATURDAY’S PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:FRIDAY’S SHUTTLE AND WEATHER UPDATE BRIEFING VIDEO:POST-SCRUB NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:DISCOVERY IN THE PREDAWN DARKESS VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S ROLLBACK OF PAD GANTRY VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF PAD GANTRY ROLLING BACK VIDEO:THE PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE IN FLORIDA FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:POST-ARRIVAL COMMENTS FROM THE CREW VIDEO:FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:SECOND LAUNCH POSTPONEMENT BRIEFING VIDEO:NARRATED MISSION OVERVIEW MOVIE VIDEO:MEET SHUTTLE DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH COMMANDER LEE ARCHAMBAULT VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH PILOT TONY ANTONELLI VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS1 JOE ACABA VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS2 STEVE SWANSON VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS3 RICKY ARNOLD VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS4 JOHN PHILLIPS VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS5 KOICHI WAKATA VIDEO:NASA OFFICIALS ANNOUNCE LAUNCH DELAY VIDEO:SPACE STATION’S VIBRATIONS DURING REBOOST VIDEO:INFORMAL NEWS CONFERENCE AT RUNWAY VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE FOR PRACTICE COUNTDOWN VIDEO:DISCOVERY POSITIONED ATOP PAD 39A VIDEO:EARLY MORNING ROLLOUT FROM THE VAB VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY ARRIVING AT PAD 39A VIDEO:DISCOVERY HOISTED FOR ATTACHMENT TO TANK VIDEO:CRANE ROTATES DISCOVERY VERTICALLY VIDEO:DISCOVERY MOVES TO ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:NOSE WHEEL LANDING GEAR RETRACTED VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY GOING VERTICAL VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF ASSEMBLY BUILDING CRANE WORK VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY’S TRIP TO VAB VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF PAYLOAD’S MOVE VIDEO:SHUTTLE AND STATION PROGRAM UPDATE VIDEO:STS-119 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW BRIEFING ON MISSION’S SPACEWALKS VIDEO:THE ASTRONAUTS’ PRE-FLIGHT NEWS BRIEFING MORE:STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Engineers ponder storage platform deploy solution BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  34. Updated @ 2:05 p.m. with EVA progress;

  35. Liquid hydrogen “fast fill” begins around 11:18 a.m. and “topping” will start around 1:13 p.m. It was around the time of topping off Wednesday that the leak occurred, when the tank was 98 percent full.Here is the remainder of today’s countdown, a timeline showing the crew’s abort options and a flight plan for the first day in space (includes NASA TV sked (rev. A); best viewed with fixed-width font):EDT………..EVENT09:18 AM……External tank ready for loading09:41 AM……Mission management team tanking meeting10:18 AM……Resume countdown (T-minus 6 hours)10:18 AM……LO2, LH2 transfer line chilldown10:28 AM……Main propulsion system chill down10:28 AM……LH2 slow fill10:58 AM……LO2 slow fill11:03 AM……Hydrogen ECO sensors go wet11:08 AM……LO2 fast fill11:18 AM……LH2 fast fill01:13 PM……LH2 topping01:18 PM……LH2 replenish01:18 PM……LO2 replenish01:18 PM……Begin 2-hour 30-minute built-in hold (T-minus 3 hours)01:18 PM……Closeout crew to white room01:18 PM……External tank in stable replenish mode01:33 PM……Astronaut support personnel comm checks02:03 PM……Pre-ingress switch reconfig03:18 PM……Final crew weather briefing03:23 PM……Crew suit up begins03:48 PM……Resume countdown (T-minus 3 hours)03:53 PM……Crew departs O&C building04:23 PM……Crew ingress05:13 PM……Astronaut comm checks05:38 PM……Hatch closure06:08 PM……White room closeout06:28 PM……Begin 10-minute built-in hold (T-minus 20m)06:38 PM……NASA test director countdown briefing06:38 PM……Resume countdown (T-minus 20m)06:39 PM……Backup flight computer to OPS 106:43 PM……KSC area clear to launch06:49 PM……Begin final built-in hold (T-minus 9m)07:19 PM……NTD launch status verification07:34:46 PM…Resume countdown (T-minus 9m)07:36:16 PM…Orbiter access arm retraction07:38:46 PM…Launch window opens07:38:46 PM…Hydraulic power system (APU) start07:38:51 PM…Terminate LO2 replenish07:39:46 PM…Purge sequence 4 hydraulic test07:39:46 PM…IMUs to inertial07:39:51 PM…Aerosurface steering test07:40:16 PM…Main engine steering test07:40:51 PM…LO2 tank pressurization07:41:11 PM…Fuel cells to internal reactants07:41:16 PM…Clear caution-and-warning memory07:41:46 PM…Crew closes visors07:41:49 PM…LH2 tank pressurization07:42:56 PM…SRB joint heater deactivation07:43:15 PM…Shuttle GPCs take control of countdown07:43:25 PM…SRB steering test07:43:39 PM…Main engine start (T-6.6 seconds)07:43:46 PM…SRB ignition (LAUNCH)Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SUNRISE AT LAUNCH PAD 39A VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF HYDROGEN ACCESS ARM RETRACTION VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF SATURDAY NIGHT’S GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:SATURDAY’S PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:FRIDAY’S SHUTTLE AND WEATHER UPDATE BRIEFING VIDEO:POST-SCRUB NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:DISCOVERY IN THE PREDAWN DARKESS VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S ROLLBACK OF PAD GANTRY VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE OF PAD GANTRY ROLLING BACK VIDEO:THE PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE IN FLORIDA FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:POST-ARRIVAL COMMENTS FROM THE CREW VIDEO:FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:SECOND LAUNCH POSTPONEMENT BRIEFING VIDEO:NARRATED MISSION OVERVIEW MOVIE VIDEO:MEET SHUTTLE DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH COMMANDER LEE ARCHAMBAULT VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH PILOT TONY ANTONELLI VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS1 JOE ACABA VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS2 STEVE SWANSON VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS3 RICKY ARNOLD VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS4 JOHN PHILLIPS VIDEO:INTERVIEW WITH MS5 KOICHI WAKATA VIDEO:NASA OFFICIALS ANNOUNCE LAUNCH DELAY VIDEO:SPACE STATION’S VIBRATIONS DURING REBOOST VIDEO:INFORMAL NEWS CONFERENCE AT RUNWAY VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE FOR PRACTICE COUNTDOWN VIDEO:DISCOVERY POSITIONED ATOP PAD 39A VIDEO:EARLY MORNING ROLLOUT FROM THE VAB VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY ARRIVING AT PAD 39A VIDEO:DISCOVERY HOISTED FOR ATTACHMENT TO TANK VIDEO:CRANE ROTATES DISCOVERY VERTICALLY VIDEO:DISCOVERY MOVES TO ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:NOSE WHEEL LANDING GEAR RETRACTED VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY GOING VERTICAL VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF ASSEMBLY BUILDING CRANE WORK VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF DISCOVERY’S TRIP TO VAB VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF PAYLOAD’S MOVE VIDEO:SHUTTLE AND STATION PROGRAM UPDATE VIDEO:STS-119 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW BRIEFING ON MISSION’S SPACEWALKS VIDEO:THE ASTRONAUTS’ PRE-FLIGHT NEWS BRIEFING MORE:Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Discovery soars at sunset to boost space station power BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  36. Seven months after the successful maiden voyage of space shuttle Columbia, astronauts Joe Engle and Richard Truly took the orbiter back into space on mission STS-2. The November 12, 1981 launch demonstrated that the space shuttle was the world’s first reusable manned spacecraft. Although their mission would be cut short, Engle and Truly performed the first tests of the shuttle’s Canadian-made robotic arm. The crew tells the story of the mission in this post-flight presentation.Endeavour pulls into port at the space station BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  37. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: October 28, 2007Astronauts Scott Parazynski and Dan Tani began repressurizing the space station’s Quest airlock module today at 12:05 p.m. to officially end a six-hour 33-minute spacewalk, the second of five planned for the shuttle Discovery’s mission.The astronauts disconnected the 35,000-pound P6 solar array truss segment, installed handrails on the newly installed Harmony module and confirmed a potentially serious problem with the drive mechanism of a massive rotary joint used to slowly turn the station’s right-side solar panels to keep them face-on to the sun.Parazynski and Tani were unable to complete all of their planned objectives, however, running out of time to install a replacement circuit breaker in the station’s electrical system and complete power connections with a newly installed robot arm grapple fixture on Harmony.”We had a little of everything today,” Tani commented before repressurizing the airlock.”Good day today. Great job,” Parazynski said.This was the 94th spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998 and the 17th so far this year. Spacewalk time for station assembly now stands at 580 hours and 46 minutes overall and 12 hours 47 minutes for Discovery’s crew.Wrapping up today’s excursion, Tani took a moment to enjoy the view of Chicago and the midwest from 213 miles up.”Break, break, for just one, 30 seconds, I’m looking at my home town!” he exclaimed.”Really?” Parazynski asked.”Yeah, let me see if I can find Lombard, (Ill.).””Oh, look at that!” someone said.”That’s an awesome view.””I see O’Hare, the airport, so I can make out my home town Lombard,” Tani said.”Too bad about those Cubbies, though,” Parazynski quipped.”Yeah, well, there’s always next century,” Tani said.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SUNDAY’S SPACEWALK VIDEO:BIOGRAPHY MOVIE ON DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:BIOGRAPHY MOVIE ON EXPEDITION 16 CREW VIDEO:BIOGRAPHY ON NEW EXPEDITION 16 MEMBER DAN TANI VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY CBS NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY FOX NEWS VIDEO:CREW INTERVIEWED BY WHAM-TV VIDEO:SATURDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS ENTER HARMONY FOR FIRST TIME VIDEO:CREW COMMENTS FROM INSIDE HARMONY VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:POST-EVA MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:FIRST STS-120 SPACEWALK CONCLUDES VIDEO:ROBOT ARM INSTALLS HARMONY ON THE STATION VIDEO:HARMONY MODULE LIFTED OUT OF PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:S-BAND ANTENNA STOWED IN DISCOVERY’S BAY VIDEO:WHEELOCK RIDES STATION ARM WITH ANTENNA VIDEO:MISSION STS-120’S SPACEWALK NO. 1 BEGINS VIDEO:ANIMATED PREVIEW OF HARMONY INSTALLATION VIDEO:NARRATED ANIMATION OF SHUTTLE PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:HARMONY’S PRE-LAUNCH PREPS AT THE CAPE VIDEO:BACKGROUND INFO ON HARMONY MODULE VIDEO:PREVIEW OF FRIDAY’S SPACEWALK VIDEO:THURSDAY MANAGEMENT TEAM NEWS BRIEFING VIDEO:POST-DOCKING MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:INSPECTION BOOM HANDED BETWEEN ROBOT ARMS VIDEO:SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD THE STATION VIDEO:RING BETWEEN THE DOCKING PORTS RETRACTED VIDEO:REPLAY OF DOCKING FROM PAYLOAD BAY CAMERAS VIDEO:SHUTTLE DISCOVERY DOCKS TO THE STATION VIDEO:DISCOVERY PERFORMS 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP VIDEO:SHUTTLE APPROACHES STATION FROM BELOW VIDEO:NARRATED PREVIEW OF THE DOCKING VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:BRIEFING ON LAUNCH IMAGERY AND TANK’S PERFORMANCE VIDEO:WEDNESDAY’S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH VIDEO:DISCOVERY’S LAUNCH AS SEEN LIVE VIDEO:EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA FROM LIFTOFF TO ORBIT VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: KSC RUNWAY VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 041 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-12 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-15 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 VIDEO:THE CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR THE PAD VIDEO:ASTRONAUTS SUITS UP ON LAUNCH MORNING VIDEO:A LOOK BACK AT SHUTTLE DISCOVERY’S HISTORY VIDEO:PAD 39A’S ROTATING GANTRY MOVED BACK VIDEO:INTERVIEW CLIPS WITH THE ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:MONDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:SUNDAY COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SATURDAY COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:WATCH THE CREW’S ARRIVAL FOR LAUNCH VIDEO:NEWS CONFERENCE AFTER FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW VIDEO:SHUTTLE DISCOVERY ROLLS TO LAUNCH PAD 39A VIDEO:CRANE HOISTS DISCOVERY FOR MATING TO TANK VIDEO:DISCOVERY MOVED TO THE VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING VIDEO:HYDRAULIC SEALS REPLACED ON LANDING GEAR STRUT VIDEO:FUEL TANK ATTACHED TO SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS VIDEO:FOAM REMOVED FROM FUEL TANK FEEDLINE BRACKETS VIDEO:STS-120 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW OF THE MISSION’S FIVE SPACEWALKS VIDEO:DISCOVERY’S ASTRONAUTS MEET THE PRESS VIDEO:BRIEFING ON SHUTTLE AND ISS PROGRAMS MORE:Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA’s first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Spacewalk to practice shuttle repairs being planned BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  38. STS-1: America’s first space shuttle mission

  39. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: November 22, 2005Four months after the shuttle Discovery’s long-awaited return to flight last July, NASA engineers still don’t know what caused a large piece of potentially dangerous foam to break away from a so-called PAL ramp on the side of the ship’s external fuel tank. Discovery’s engines roar to life for the shuttle’s return to flight launch in July. Credit: NASAComplicating the picture, engineers recently found nine small cracks in the hydrogen PAL ramp of another tank, one that went through two supercold fueling cycles at the Kennedy Space Center last Spring before it was replaced with a different tank to resolve other problems.Figuring out how to keep the long, hand-sprayed foam wind deflectors intact is driving NASA’s launch schedule. Despite the loss of one to three months due to the impact of Hurricane Katrina, agency managers hope to have Discovery ready for another launch next spring.But shuttle program manager Wayne Hale said today that assumes engineers figure out what to do about the foam problem that marred Discovery’s July launching.”Guys, people talk to us about schedule pressure,” he said, bristling somewhat after a question about the presumed May launch target. “I’m going to tell you something. The only people I get schedule pressure from is the media. We have not set a launch date. I’ve said that, I don’t know how many times, in media briefings. We have not set a launch date. We are working through the investigation.”We have assessed the schedule and if the testing gets completed as is planned, and if it comes out the way we think it might likely come out, then we think there is a probability that we will be able to launch in May. But we have not set that as a schedule, it is not driving us.”I’ll put this in very simple words and plain English. The results of the technical investigation are going to allow us to fly. We are not driving to a date on a calendar that was set arbitrarily. We’re not allowing ourselves to be driven to do something stupid. We are not doing that.”That said, the next realistic shuttle launch window opens in May with the shuttle Discovery and external tank 119. Assuming a liftoff on May 3, ET-119 must be shipped from Lockheed Martin’s Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to the Kennedy Space Center by around Feb. 2. The trip by barge takes about five days.Another tank, ET-120 – the one with cracks in its hydrogen PAL ramp – would need to be at KSC by around March 23 to support a possible June rescue flight by the shuttle Atlantis.Having a second shuttle on standby, ready to carry out an emergency rescue mission in case of major problems, is a post-Columbia safety enhancement. NASA managers will meet in December to discuss whether flights beyond Discovery’s will require such standby rescue missions. A photo taken from Discovery shows the missing piece of foam on the external fuel tank following the July launch. Credit: NASADownload larger image version The shuttle’s external tank is made up of a large hydrogen tank, a so-called intertank section and an upper oxygen tank. Gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, used to pressurize the tanks, are diverted from the propellants feeding the shuttle’s main engines and routed up the tops of the tanks in externally mounted pipes. The pressurization lines run next to a long cable tray that carries electrical lines that route data and commands between the shuttle and various tank and booster subsystems.”Those two pipes carry the pressurization gas, hydrogen and oxygen, that are bled off the main engines that keep the pressure up inside the tank,” Hale said. “You can’t fly without pressurizing the tanks.”When the shuttle was designed in the 1970s, engineers believed shock waves during the vehicle’s transition to supersonic speeds could cause potentially serious damage to the pressurization lines and/or the cable tray. As a result, the tank was equipped with two protuberance air load, or PAL, ramps, one running along the upper section of the hydrogen tank and the other along the outside of the oxygen tank.The ramps are built up by workers at Michoud, who manually spray on foam and then sculpt it, making ramps that smooth the flow of supersonic air over the pressurization lines and cable tray.The shuttle Columbia was destroyed by foam insulation that broke away from a different area of the tank during launch in January 2003. That foam was eliminated during the post-disaster recovery. But during Discovery’s flight last July, a large piece of the hydrogen PAL ramp broke off.”With all the testing we’ve done so far, and we’re only part way into it – we expect to complete our testing, by the way, between mid December and mid January – we haven’t found any ‘eureka,’ or smoking gun so far,” said John Chapman, external tank project manager.Hale said engineers are assessing three options. All three require the PAL ramps on existing tanks to be removed:Developing new manual foam application techniques to ensure more uniform buildup of the insulating material used to make the PAL ramps;Developing a robotic foam spraying machine to automate the ramp buildup process and, again, improve consistency;Completing exhaustive tests and analyses that might clear the way to removing the ramps altogether.”In the long run, we have decided we would like to remove this fairly large piece of foam, just eliminate the hazard that it might cause,” Hale said. “We think we have a very strong case to be ready to take that ramp off by the third flight tank. Some folks believe we can accelerate that and potentially even remove it for the STS-121 tank.” Discovery blasts off in July on STS-114. Credit: NASASTS-121 is NASA’s designation for Discovery’s next mission. But Hale said the amount of testing required to prove the ramps can be safely removed could take until next Fall to complete.”Before you remove the wind deflector, you need to make sure those structures won’t come off in the supersonic flight regime that we see,” Hale said. “So the aerodynamic (analysis) process, which is greatly improved over where we were in 1979, 1980 and 1981, is looking to see if we have the structural margin in the system to fly without that protection that the foam ramp provides.”The reason the foam ramps were put on in those days nearly 30 years ago is that the aerodynamics indicated the structure was marginal to hold together during those supersonic loading periods when the shock waves off the tips of the solid rocket boosters interact with the side of the tank. Today, there is a great deal of hope that we can prove that the structure, which has been improved over time, strengthened over time, can hold up to that buffet and not come off.”But that is a risk that you do not take without having a good engineering analysis,” Hale said. “So we’re starting a campaign of wind tunnel tests, computational fluid dynamics modeling with supercomputers to try to understand that better and feed that back into the structural analysis to make sure those parts stay on.”He said it is possible engineers could complete the work in time for Discovery’s next flight, but “it is more likely that it will take us to the fall of next year” to complete the work.As for ET-120, Chapman said a close inspection found nine hairline cracks distributed across the length of the hydrogen PAL ramp. The cracks were not present when the tank was shipped to the Kennedy Space Center. They were discovered when the tank was shipped back following Hurricane Katrina.ET-120 originally was slated to fly with Discovery last July. It was loaded with supercold rocket fuel twice before other issues prompted NASA to replace it with a different tank.Interestingly, another tank, one that was not subjected to fuel loading, did not experience any PAL ramp cracking.”We’ve looked at the tank that wasn’t on the launch pad, it didn’t get filled and pressurized,” Hale said. “It has no indications (of cracks). And the tank out on the pad, did. That’s about as close to conclusive as you get in this business.”It appears the thermal cycles, the stretch and contraction of thermal cycles, or pressurization, is a factor here. All the engineering reports haven’t been done, we’ve got to get to the bottom of it. Now whether or not these particular little indications are significant and could cause the liberation of foam, that’s what the testing is going to tell us in the next few weeks.”Steve Poulos, manager of the orbiter projects office at the Johnson Space Center, updated reporters on three other open items left over from Discovery’s July flight.He said a post-flight inspection of the shuttle’s reinforced carbon carbon wing leading edge panels showed no major signs of damage, adding that new inspection techniques will allow engineers to spot trouble areas earlier.In addition, two relatively minor in-flight problems have now been resolved.Missing or broken stitching on an insulation blanket under the commander’s cockpit window was responsible for damage spotted in orbit. Poulos said about 40 blankets on Discovery and another 60 on Atlantis will be replaced to eliminate any such suspect stitching.Two protruding gap fillers – spacers between heat shield tiles on the belly of the orbiter – had to be manually removed during a spacewalk after they were seen extending up above the surrounding tiles. Left in place, the protruding gap fillers could have led to increased heating, and subsequent damage, during the return to Earth.Poulos said engineers understood what caused the gap fillers to pull away and were in the process of conducting tests to weed out any more loose spacers. The work is being prioritized and Poulos said the most critical areas near the nose of the shuttle would be tested first. Any problems will be corrected before Discovery flies again.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:TUESDAY’S SHUTTLE PROGRAM UPDATE VIDEO:QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION MORE: STS-114 PRE-FLIGHT COVERAGE MORE: STS-114 LAUNCH TO LANDING STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Expedition 21The official embroidered patch for the International Space Station Expedition 21 crew is now available from our stores.Hubble PatchThe official embroidered patch for mission STS-125, the space shuttle’s last planned service call to the Hubble Space Telescope, is available for purchase.–> | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Crack found in Discovery external tank insulation BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  40. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: August 14, 2007The Endeavour astronauts are working to robotically install a 7,000-pound equipment storage platform on the international space station today, a complex procedure requiring tight choreography between the shuttle and station robot arms.Educator-astronaut Barbara Morgan, assisted by Tracy Caldwell, used Endeavour’s 50-foot-long robot arm to lock onto a grapple fixture on External Storage Platform No. 3 around 9:13 a.m. She began slowly pulling the platform from its perch in the orbiter’s cargo bay a half hour later. Shuttle pilot Charles Hobaugh, operating the station’s arm from a work station inside the Destiny laboratory module, was standing by to latch onto ESP-3 for the actual installation on the left side of the station’s solar power truss.”This is the first ESP (equipment storage platform) that is being installed only by robotics,” said station flight director Heather Rarick. “Station-wide, this is the first major element that’s been brought up and installed this way. So it’s a new moment for us here in using the robotic arms. And of course, it will take both robotic arms to do this.”It is a challenge because there is the choreography of handing the piece of equipment from one arm to the next and then getting it into the correct location, the attach system on the truss where it needs to live permanently. There are also heaters and electrical power … for equipment that is located on this platform. This platform holds spare equipment for us so that in the future we don’t have to rely on another vehicle reaching the space station to make any repairs.”This afternoon, Morgan and Caldwell, who is celebrating her 38th birthday in space today, will participate in a series of media interviews starting around 2 p.m. This will be teacher-turned-astronaut Morgan’s first opportunity to answer questions from reporters about her experiences in space since Endeavour’s launching last Wednesday. Later today, around 5:09 p.m., Morgan plans to participate in the first of three educational events planned for the mission.Here is an updated timeline of today’s activity in space (in EDT and mission elapsed time; ESP-3 installation in progress and times out of date):EDT…………DD…HH…MM…EVENT08/14/07Tue 06:37 AM…05…12…00…STS/ISS crew wakeupTue 08:17 AM…05…13…40…Shuttle arm (SRMS) grapples ESP-3Tue 08:22 AM…05…13…45…BOK-3 Russian computer replace/testingTue 08:32 AM…05…13…55…SRMS ESP-3 unberthingTue 09:02 AM…05…14…25…SRMS ESP-3 handoffTue 09:42 AM…05…15…05…Station arm (SSRMS) ESP-3 grappleTue 09:57 AM…05…15…20…SRMS ungrapples ESP-3Tue 09:57 AM…05…15…20…EVA-3: Tools configuredTue 10:12 AM…05…15…35…SSRMS maneuvers ESP-3 to install positionTue 11:12 AM…05…16…35…ESP-3 installationTue 11:57 AM…05…17…20…SSRMS ungrapples ESP-3Tue 11:57 AM…05…17…20…Spacesuit swapTue 12:12 PM…05…17…35…SSRMS WS4 configured for translationTue 12:27 PM…05…17…50…Equipment lock prepsTue 12:32 PM…05…17…55…Crew meals beginTue 01:57 PM…05…19…20…EVA-3: Tools configuredTue 02:01 PM…05…19…25…U.S. network interviews with Morgan, CaldwellTue 03:22 PM…05…20…45…OBSS OSE EVA-4 prepTue 04:22 PM…05…21…45…Lab window pane replacementTue 05:09 PM…05…22…33…PAO educational eventTue 05:30 PM…05…22…54…Mission status briefing on NASA TVTue 06:22 PM…05…23…45…EVA-3: Procedures reviewTue 08:32 PM…06…01…55…EVA-3: Mask pre-breatheTue 09:17 PM…06…02…40…EVA-3: Airlock depress to 10.2 psiTue 09:37 PM…06…03…00…ISS crew sleep beginsTue 10:07 PM…06…03…30…STS crew sleep beginsTue 11:00 PM…06…04…24…Daily video highlights reel on NASA TVAt the Johnson Space Center in Houston, meanwhile, engineers are pressing ahead with testing and contingency planning to deal with a small gouge in the shuttle’s heat shield tiles. A decision on whether to order a spacewalk repair is expected later this week, after a series of tests to assess what sort of damage, if any, the shuttle’s fuselage might experience during re-entry.John Shannon, chairman of NASA’s Mission Management Team, said Monday the damage is not believed to pose a catastrophic threat to the shuttle or its crew and if some other emergency forced a speedy return to Earth, Endeavour could safely land as is.”We’re not talking about catastrophic damage,” Shannon said. “But if I have to pull off five or six tiles (after landing) and put a doubler on some structure, replace a rib or anything like that, that’s going to increase my turnaround time between (flights) and I’d like to avoid that if possible, if I have an EVA that I think is easy to execute. Now all of that assumes we come back and show that we would have localized heating that could cause some damage underneath and we haven’t done that yet.”The testing will determine whether a spacewalk is needed.”If you ask me whether I think it will or not, I’d probably lean toward it’s not going to be absolutely required to do,” he said. “The initial simplified cavity model that they ran today passed with no structural damage, no reduction of structural margins at all. But again, it’s a simplified model. Since the flow is a little tricky, we want to make sure that we get it exactly right and we’ll run that, make sure we understand it and if we don’t have to do anything, well we had good practice in pulling together these procedures. And if we do have to do it, I feel fully confident we could execute that with a minimal impact to the mission.”To protect against the possibility of a spacewalk, a team of engineers and astronauts is assessing various repair options. The astronauts are trained for three different types of repair, ranging from the application of a black paint-like material and/or the injection of a thick putty-like insulator to a large carbon composite panel that could be screwed into surrounding tiles to form a thermal barrier. Late Monday, engineers ruled out the latter option because of the small size of the gouge and the complexity of the panel installation procedure.The Endeavour astronauts plan to carry out space station assembly spacewalks Wednesday and Friday. The Friday EVA involves relatively low-priority get-ahead work and mission managers could opt to substitute a tile repair spacewalk instead. Another option would be to extend Endeavour’s mission an additional few days and stage a fifth spacewalk. But no final decisions will be made until testing is complete.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:STOWAGE PLATFORM INSTALLATION EXPLAINED VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 6 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SHANNON GIVES UPDATE ON TILE DAMAGE ANALYSIS VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 6 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 2 VIDEO:SPACEWALK NO. 2 BEGINS VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS UNBOLT THE FAILED GYROSCOPE VIDEO:THE FAILED GYRO IS REMOVED FROM THE STATION VIDEO:NEW GYRO IS RETRIEVED FROM SHUTTLE PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS BRING NEW GYRO UP TO THE STATION VIDEO:THE NEW GYRO IS INSTALLED AND BOLTED DOWN VIDEO:FAILED GYRO PUT ON STATION STOWAGE PLATFORM VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:HURRICANE FLOSSIE ON SUNDAY EVENING VIDEO:CREW INSPECTIONS SHUTTLE TILE DAMAGE VIDEO:INSPECTION BOOM FOR DAMAGE CHECK VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 5 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 4 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SPACEWALK NO. 1 BEGINS VIDEO:SPACEWALKERS REMOVE LAUNCH LOCKS ON S5 TRUSS VIDEO:ROBOT ARM INSTALLS STARBOARD 5 TRUSS ON STATION VIDEO:STARBOARD 5 TRUSS BOLTED TO THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:TRUSS’S GRAPPLE FIXTURE REMOVED VIDEO:PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 1 VIDEO:STARBOARD 5 TRUSS INSTALLATION EXPLAINED VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 3 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:STARBOARD 5 TRUSS PULLED OUT OF PAYLOAD BAY VIDEO:TRUSS HANDED FROM SHUTTLE ARM TO STATION ARM VIDEO:SHUTTLE ASTRONAUTS WELCOMED ABOARD STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE DOCKS TO THE STATION AS SEEN LIVE VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR AND STATION FLY INTO ORBITAL SUNRISE VIDEO:SHUTTLE DOES BACKFLIP BELOW THE STATION VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR INTERCEPTS THE SPACE STATION VIDEO:SHUTTLE TI BURN SEEN FROM STATION VIDEO:ANIMATED PREVIEW OF DOCKING VIDEO:FIRST IN-SPACE COMMENTS FROM BARBARA MORGAN VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:SHUTTLE INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED VIDEO:FLIGHT DAY 2 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:THE FULL LAUNCH EXPERIENCE VIDEO:JETTISONED EXTERNAL TANK FALLS AWAY VIDEO:THE FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: EXTERNAL TANK CAMERA VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PLAYALINDA WIDESCREEN VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: COMPLEX 41 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: KSC RUNWAY VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD FRONT VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA UCS-12 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAY: BEACH TRACKER VIDEO:ENDEAVOUR BLASTS OFF! VIDEO:CREW’S LAUNCH MORNING PHOTO IN DINING ROOM VIDEO:UPCLOSE FOOTAGE OF THE GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF GANTRY ROLLBACK VIDEO:TUESDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:STS-118 PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:MONDAY MORNING’S STATUS BRIEFING VIDEO:SUNDAY COUNTDOWN AND WEATHER UPDATE VIDEO:CREW ARRIVES AT KENNEDY SPACE CENTER VIDEO:COMMENTS FROM EACH OF THE ASTRONAUTS VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: SCOTT KELLY VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: CHARLIE HOBAUGH VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: TRACY CALDWELL VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: RICK MASTRACCHIO VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: DAVE WILLIAMS VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: BARBARA MORGAN VIDEO:PRE-FLIGHT INTERVIEW: ALVIN DREW MORE:John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Crew prepares for Saturday’s station spacewalk BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

  41. STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: August 24, 2007Shuttle program managers have ordered repairs to downstream external fuel tanks to remove underlying insulation around propellant feedline support brackets because of cracks found in the wake of a foam-shedding incident that damaged the shuttle Endeavour’s heat shield earlier this month. The work is not expected to delay the next shuttle flight, targeted for launch around Oct. 23, but the schedule is extremely tight for the flight after that in December. Discovery’s fuel tank will be modified inside Kennedy Space Center’s Vehicle Assembly Building. Credit: NASA-KSC”We think this work will take about nine days, give or take, in the Vehicle Assembly Building,” shuttle Program Manager Wayne Hale told reporters today. “We have looked at the launch schedule and that will still allow us, with a number of days of reserve, to launch the next shuttle mission on October the 23rd. We’re looking at downstream schedules, but at first review of those schedules it appears that we can still launch the subsequent mission by the end of the December launch window … with very little to no contingency time.”But Hale stressed that properly fixing the external tanks – not the pre-existing launch schedule – is NASA’s top priority.”The point is, we will take the amount of time that we need to to get this repair done properly,” he said. “We will not rush and if we happen to fall a day or two after the 23rd, that is not a huge impact to our schedule. The schedules for the following flights obviously are more fluid and we’ll be reviewing those as the work goes forward.”The shuttle Discovery is scheduled for blastoff Oct. 23 on a flight to deliver a new multi-hatch connecting module to the international space station. That module, after the station crew attaches it to the front of the Destiny laboratory module, will serve as the mounting point for the European Space Agency’s Columbus research lab, scheduled for launch in early December, and the Japanese Kibo laboratory complex, which will be carried aloft early next year.Getting the international partner modules launched is NASA’s major near-term priority after years of delays caused in large part by the 2003 Columbia disaster.Columbia was brought down by a large hole in its left wing leading edge that was caused by the impact of foam debris during launch. Redesigning the tank’s insulation in the wake of the accident to minimize foam shedding has been a major challenge for the engineering community.That point was brought home during the flight of shuttle Endeavour earlier this month when a half-ounce piece of debris popped off a liquid oxygen feedline support bracket, hit a downstream attach strut and ricocheted into the belly of the orbiter. The impact gouged a hole almost all the way through two tiles.After around-the-clock tests and analyses, NASA managers concluded Endeavour could safely re-enter as is. After the ship’s uneventful touchdown Tuesday, engineers found little additional damage and Endeavour should be repaired in short order.But the incident raised new questions about the insulation on the feedline brackets. NASA already had decided to make a change, ordering titanium brackets for future tanks that will minimize the need for insulation in that area. But the new brackets won’t be ready until four flights from now, prompting hurried analysis to determine what, if anything, to do about the next three tanks in the sequence.”Part of the review of the video (from Endeavour’s flight) indicates we potentially lost an underlying thermal protection agent called super-lightweight ablative, SLA as it’s commonly called, which was added to this fitting on the tank when we thought we were going to fly different trajectories which have a higher heating during ascent,” Hale said.”We now know, and have known for some time, that the super-lightweight ablative is not really required. The damage that we saw on STS-118, given the trajectory, the size and speed of the debris, could not have been caused, we don’t believe, by the lightweight foam alone, but must have had a heavier weight component, either this SLA underlying that foam or potentially ice on the foam.”Hale said engineers this week X-rayed the five oxygen feedline brackets on external tank No. 120, scheduled for use by Discovery in October, and found several small cracks in the underlying SLA material. Other downstream tanks also had cracks in the bracket insulation.”The exact origin of those cracks is still under investigation,” Hale said. “We think it’s associated with the manufacturing process, but clearly this could lead to a shedding of foam debris along with this heavier weight SLA, which we now know could have a debris transport path to the underside of the orbiter. Therefore we’ve decided this is an unacceptable situation.”At the Kennedy Space Center this weekend, engineers from Lockheed Martin’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where the huge tanks are built, will begin removing the outer BX foam and underlying SLA from at least the top four feedline brackets on ET-120.”We will replace that with only the lightweight foam, which will provide us the ice growth inhibiting function and certainly is acceptable for all ascent phases,” Hale said. “We still have about five contingency days remaining in our schedule for Oct. 23.”Hale said the super-lightweight ablator is intended to protect the brackets from heating as the shuttle accelerates out of the atmosphere. The foam on the outside is primarily intended to prevent ice from forming on the brackets before launch when the tank is loaded with supercold propellants.Wind tunnel testing and computer analysis show the trajectories the shuttle currently uses to reach orbit for space station assembly flights do not subject the brackets to the level of heating originally expected and Hale said the SLA can be safely replaced with low-density BX foam instead.While engineers are hopeful they can keep Discovery on track for launch on or close to its Oct. 23 target date, the picture is less clear for the flight after that. The launch window for Atlantis and the Columbus module, defined in part by temperature constraints imposed by the station’s orbit, opens Dec. 6 and closes just one week later.The problem for NASA is that work to refurbish aging systems in the Vehicle Assembly Building where shuttles, tanks and boosters are assembled has created a bottleneck of sorts, preventing the sort of parallel processing that might otherwise be possible.As it now stands, Hale said Atlantis can still make the end of its December window. But just barely. The launch window will reopen at the end of December but NASA wants to avoid flying over the New Year break if at all possible.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia’s historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard’s historic Mercury mission with this collectors’ item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Shuttle to undock today BY WILLIAM HARWOOD

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